Flow Training – Maximising Performance in Rock Climbing – Case Study

Flow Training – Maximising Performance in Rock Climbing – Case Study

Flow Sports Tips and Training Videos

We are delighted to announce some great results on a recent study with rock climbers receiving flow training. The climbers received 4 different types of training over a 3 month period and the results far exceeded our expectations.

Below is Camille’s account of what happened. Camille is a budding adventure enthusiast who competes in a multitude of sports and a true inspiration. She runs a great blog for those wanting to see how she quit her job to focus on a life worth living: http://www.farandhigh.co.uk/

Over to Camille and her a piece, she wrote to go on her blog.

I was delighted when Cameron, the training coach from the Flow Centre, offered me to be part of the group of elite climbers selected for a case study on flow training.

Initially, I didn’t know what the flow mindset was and it is thanks to the study that I learnt more about it.

Flow is the optimal mental state that produces performance, creativity, decision-making and innovation.”

Flow is a psychological state we experience during our peak experiences and is behind many of the greatest athletic performances.  It is the state when we perform at our best and feel our best.

As part of the study, the climbers were asked to complete the same indoor climbing route twice a week, time ourselves and then complete a questionnaire straight after each climb including questions on our performance and our flow state.  We were also asked to rate our overall climb.  As weeks progressed, we were provided with training and individual coaching sessions on flow.

camilee2

Throughout this experience, I’ve learnt some great tips on how to train your mind to get into the flow state and how to maintain that state. I thought I’d share the most valuable ones to me.

  1. Motivation to perform

For me, motivation to perform is the biggest contributor to get me into a flow state, i.e. the desire to get to the top of the route.  When the motivation is missing, my performance suffers.  When the motivation is at its best and I truly want to reach the top, I’m enjoying the moment and I give it me all.

  1. Total Focus

Secondly, finding focus is key to get me in the right state of mind.  I need to completely shut down the outside world around me.  For example, I need to ignore other climbers watching or shouting tips during a training session (sorry, I know you’re only trying to help J).  This is especially true during a climbing competition when I find the audience very unnerving and it makes me anxious.  So I need to completely zone out my surroundings and forget about my ego, so I can totally concentrate on the task at hand.

  1. Be in the Present

To reach and maintain flow, I need to be completely focused on the present moment. I can’t be thinking about anything else other than each move as it unfolds.  If I’m already thinking about reaching the top whilst I’m only half way up, my mind is not in the present.

  1. Challenging Route

The climb has to be challenging enough for me to get into the flow state.  If it is during the warm-up or an easy climb, it’s not motivating enough for me to really be in the flow.

  1. Physical Readiness & Self belief

I’ve found that my perception of my physical fitness and readiness to climb a route has an impact on my ability to reach and maintain the flow state. If I feel physically ready and capable, then I feel in control and there are no limits!

  1. Fear of falling

When I have reached the flow state, I am so focused on each move that there is no holding back and I forget about the fear of falling (even in the dreaded overhangs!).

With the help of our coach Cameron, I have come up with my climbing mantra which I now repeat to myself at the start of each climb, and sometimes in the middle:

  1. Focus
  2. Precision
  3. Power
  4. Excel

Repeating the mantra in my mind has been very effective to help me get into the flow when everything seems to come together and I perform to my highest standard.

camille

To conclude, my personal results from the route I climbed during the study are:

  • Route: 14m 6C+ route
  • 1st attempt completed in 9min23s.
  • After having received the training and coaching on flows, I completed the climbing route on my 15thattempt in 2min10s.

Of course, once I knew my results, my first question was related to the fact that even without the coaching, my performance would have improved naturally just by the experience gained by every attempt and the increased memorization of the moves.  However, this was minimised by having us only start the training and coaching on flows once our performances had plateaued and we weren’t climbing faster at each attempt.

Finally, being part of the study and learning about applying flows for sporting performance was definitely eye opening and a great opportunity for me in the pursuit of following my passion for the sport and performing the best I can.

These techniques can, of course, be applied to any experiences in life.  I’m also currently working on applying these techniques to my running and learning to find the flow state during a run J  So I’ve now created a mantra for running as well …

Flow Interview – Tom Carroll – Legend & World Champion Surfer

Flow Interview – Tom Carroll – Legend & World Champion Surfer

Articles To Inspire Flow Performance Skills Quotes Sports Stories Tips and Training Videos

This year’s World Surf League Margaret River Drug Aware Pro 2015 was a truly special event. Not only did I get to spend some time in the Competitors VIP Tent talking with the current best surfers in the world, but I also got to see some insane surfing in some of the best conditions this leg of the tour has seen in years. Some highlights of the event can be seen here.

I met up with Tom Carroll at the event to chat about flow and understand how it has been instrumental to his life and surfing. For those that don’t know Tom Carroll he has been voted as one of the top 10 greatest surfers of all time and been crowned World Champion twice. Even today, at the age of 53, he continues to push limits, searching the globe to ride the world’s biggest swells for his TV series ‘Storm Surfers’. In fact, when I met up with him, he had just taken a huge beating, injuring his hip, at the intimidating Boat Ramps surf break – a break not for the feint hearted, especially on a day like today with massive swell.

After speaking to Nat Young and Josh Kerr about flow, whose responses echoed the sentiment ‘flow – I’m always in flow, it’s what a I live for’, the legend himself talked about how he sees flow and how he plugs-in.

 

tom carroll surfing

Cameron:  
Where’s the mic on this… down here. Maybe you hold it.

Tom:
“Okay, yeah.”

Cameron:
How did you feel when you’re in it (Flow) and what was your top experiences like?

Tom: 
“Well, I had my first really clear flow movement experience when I was 13 years of age. Obviously I’ve done a lot of surfing, to that point, I’ve been already surfing since seven years of age. I was on a board that I absolutely loved, that really fitted into my body at that time. I was surfing a right-hand point-break which I hadn’t experienced before, but it was a very comfortable place to surf, or something that—I loved surfing a long wave where I got to do a lot of maneuvres on the wave. It was probably for the first time I’d actually ridden a wave where I could do that many maneuvres on, so I was pretty excited. You know, just excited to be out there, loved the board, so I was in a very nice environment. And then, towards the end of the session… I never forget, taking a wave a little bit longer and further down the beach and getting drifted down the beach to a whole new wave.”

“There was no one surfing on it, I was by myself so I got into the flow moment, which I recognised as a moment in time where nothing could go wrong. All my timing was absolutely perfectly in harmony with the wave, perfectly in harmony with my body movements and my timing and my understanding of what was happening at that time. I couldn’t get, I could not fall off the board even if I tried. That was a really clear moment, and I can feel it now, I can sense it in my body at this point – I’m 53 now so it’s a long time ago! So yeah, you’re looking at 40 years ago I can sort of get that real clear emotional response in my body to that.”

“It was a really lovely feeling, and I just wanted to stay out there and keep in that space, but obviously you’ve got to come in – you know, it’s getting dark.”

“It could’ve lasted—I can’t remember exactly the length of that time, but because of the nature of surfing… You know, I’m paddling out, looking for waves, feeling what’s the best wave to take, feeling the drop, feeling the move on the wave, and feeling totally in sync with how the wave was moving, and the board and how I was moving on the wave. It probably lasted up to… You know, I probably came in and out of the experience through that hour or two, but it was long, elongated, suspended… a suspended feeling of flow.”

Cameron:
Yeah. Describe when you were actually in it and on the wave, ~sort of~ the highest points.

Tom:    
“Yeah, yeah. The highest points was on the wave…

“I’d noticed clearly that I couldn’t fall off, that I was totally in sync. I could move wherever I wanted to, I knew with a sixth sense that I was able to push it, I was able to push my board to its limit and I could push myself to my limit at that time. There was no separation between me, the board and the wave, it was all connected and it was all kind of one thing, not separated at all; I was linked up

“The future, drawing way off into the future for my second really clear… and in competition feeling the flow moment was at the Pipe Masters in 1991, I had two day of getting into the flow moment during competition. I’d had a big year of competitive experience that year, I was ~fine-tuned~ emotionally, physically, and you’d have to say spiritually at the same time. My wife was having our first child and she was full of little Jenna. She’s 23 now by the way and also a ballerina, so she’s felt the flow.”

[laughs]

“In that time at the Pipe Masters I had several moments where I was just doing and not being, or I guess I was being and not doing; I don’t know how to separate that. I was in the flow in the moments where my body, the wave, the board… nothing was in the way. Everything was in sync, everything was in clear focus and I wasn’t thinking things through, I was just doing it and being it. There was a move that was recorded – you know, they call it the snap ~heard~ around the world, there was that move that was done in the preliminary round, in the first day of competition, and then I ended up going on to win that event the next day. In the final I scored a 10-point ride, I got a very, very late drop where I couldn’t think about it – I was just doing it – and I was able to sort myself, sort my body movement, sort everything out without having to think about it.”

 

tom carroll surfing

“It was all second nature, it was all sixth sense, and most definitely for me… That day I was probably at the top of my game. So, yeah.  That was two really clear examples of where I’ve been, but there’s probably been… hundreds of moments where I’ve been felt the flow, and even to the point where I felt it the other day [laughs] here at Margaret River just practicing surfing, just for fun. Yeah.”

Cameron:     
Obviously the critical elements of surfing, the big wave and the consequences of it hurting when it goes wrong help us to kind of push into that pocket and out of our brain and into that moment where we find flow. Is there anything else that you feel is a big help to kind of plugging into that? Is there anything that you do, maybe not consciously, or maybe preparation that leads up to it the morning of, or just before you’re about to paddle, or when you’re looking at the waves before you head out?

Tom:   
“I think connecting with the breath is probably the biggest thing for me. Connecting with my breath at the deepest level, like right down into the hip, into the hips and push my breath. Being aware of my breath and doing a number of breaths very, very consciously brings me further into my body, and that’s where I need to be. Quite often my scattered and very short attention span takes me out of my body, so coming back into my body… One particular exercise I used to do whilst competing was a chant, that’s where I used to say the four Ps which was power, precision, performance, perfect. Power, precision, performance, perfect – it’s like a chant.”

Cameron: 
A mantra.

Tom:
“A mantra yeah – whilst I was paddling, so each paddle I’d say “power”—as I was paddling out “power, precision, performance, perfect” so my mind would remain focused on what was coming up next for me on the wave. On the wave everything sorted out because I’ve got to respond, I can’t think, the wave’s always sort of drawing me to the present, I can’t… I don’t have time because mother nature aint’ going to wait for me. [laughs] She’s not going to wait, so what I’ve got to do is respond to her so that everything’s sorted out for me once I’m stood up on the wave, as long as I’m out of the way. So, getting myself out of the way by creating—and I’d learnt that working with a mantra helped a lot in bringing myself to the moment and keeping myself focused and not attending—you know, drifting off on to what the other competitor’s doing, what the scores were… I mean, I need to know what the scores were, but that’s secondary to my performance really.”

“I’m the only one on the wave, I’m the only one on my board, and I need to be connected to that. I don’t sort of seek constantly and consciously to always be in the flow, I wouldn’t say that’s my main aim, I wouldn’t say that’s… I do look for it for competitive excellence, but not… it’s not something that I always, always go for. I do allow myself space to be… you know, just to be… allowing my brain to move and be elastic so to speak. Because I think that’s absolutely crucial for flow.”

Cameron:    
How do you think flow can help other people?

Tom:  
“I think it helps anyone just to be present in what they’re doing, and this is what… this is pretty much another kind of meditative state that we get to where our body and mind and attention is really placed upon the most important thing, and that is right now. So, we get to attend to be a lot more present in our basic everyday task, whether it’d be doing the washing-up [laughs], whether it’d be opening the car door, whether it’d be… Yeah, just being more present in our relationships, being more present in our life in general. I think ~it’ll~ help us become more able to make clearer decisions and actually help ourselves and others at the same time. It has such a multiple sort of faceted kind of plus to our lives when we get more present. This has been my experience and it’s helped me a lot.

 

We would like to take this opportunity to thank Tom Carroll for his time and words on flow and look forward to hearing his experiences and wisdom on flow in the future.

 

 

Aucamthor: Cameron Norsworthy – Performance Director

 

Flow, happiness and the future of positive psychology

Flow, happiness and the future of positive psychology

Articles To Inspire Flow Performance Skills Quotes Videos

Martin Seligman, one of the founders of the positive psychology movement, recently gave an important TED talk (which can be viewed below). In his overview of what humans require in order to attain more life satisfaction, Seligman outlined how flow is a major part of the Holy Grail.

The talk starts by explaining the successes of traditional psychology. Psychology was originally born out of the disease-led model and existed to find solutions to mental illnesses that were rife in society. It has succeeded to date by successfully treating fourteen disorders and curing two. More importantly it has provided a scientific approach towards understanding mental illness.

We have been able to measure previously fuzzy concepts such as depression, alcoholism and schizophrenia, and learned about the various causalities. We have also been able to invent and test treatments, and have successfully been able to make ‘miserable people, less miserable‘, as Seligman put its.

However, and it’s a big one at that, one of the main failures has been the focus on making the average person happier or improving normal lives. This traditional approach to psychology has not found out how to nurture talent or which positive interventions are more successful than others.

Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 10.02.33 am

Positive psychology has taken giant strides in the last decade towards rectifying this issue. Interestingly it has found that the happiest people are not those that have more money, a religious affinity or a more comfortable life. But there is one significant correlational result; the happiest people are those that are social – “Each of them is in a romantic relationship and each has a rich repertoire of friends”, says Seligman.

Happiness is also a vague concept that has been used and abused over the years, and is often very misleading. As a result, happiness has been defined into three types of lives.

Firstly is the pleasurable life, which is attained by creating pleasure and as many positive emotions as possible. This is the type of life Hollywood sells, as do the many marketing campaigns that so readily litter our environments. Although these positive emotions are pleasurable they are very habitual; meaning that “it’s all like French vanilla ice cream, the first taste is a 100%; by the time you’re down to the sixth taste, it’s gone” as Seligman puts it. He goes on to say that the pleasurable life is not very malleable and heritable.

The second life is a good life. Now listen up, because this is where flow comes in. This life is about engagement, total absorption in what we are doing. It is void of positive emotion, as time stops and we become connected with the task at hand. To attain this lifestyle we must identify our signature strengths and re-craft our life to use these strengths in our work, love and play. Interestingly, people who experience these flow moments that make up the ‘good life’ are not consumed by positive emotion that the many marketing campaigns will desire us to search for.

Lastly is the meaningful life – where we use our strengths for something bigger than ourselves. These altruistic actions leave a lasting level of happiness way past the actual event.

Seligman goes on to say that to understand life satisfaction we have studied these three types of lives: “And we’ve done this in fifteen replications involving thousands of people – to what extent does the pursuit of pleasure, the pursuit of positive emotion, the pleasant life, the pursuit of engagement, time stopping for you, and the pursuit of meaning contribute to life satisfaction?…. Our results surprised us, but they were backward of what we thought. It turns out the pursuit of pleasure has almost no contribution to life satisfaction. The pursuit of meaning is the strongest. The pursuit of engagement is also very strong. Where pleasure matters is if you have both engagement and you have meaning, then pleasure’s the whipped cream and the cherry. Which is to say, the full life — the sum is greater than the parts, if you’ve got all three. Conversely, if you have none of the three, the empty life, the sum is less than the parts.” He goes on to say that life satisfaction is more significantly found through finding flow and meaning in what we are doing.

So to attempt to summarise a 20-minute talk into a sentence and relate it to us flow seekers out there: Keep going. Keep searching for flow in everything we do and along the way find our own meaning to what we are doing. If we can experience flow for a meaningful purpose, then we are on the road to the Holy Grail of happiness.

 

 

Flow Interview – Andrew McBride – performance coach

Flow Interview – Andrew McBride – performance coach

Articles To Inspire Flow Performance Skills Sports Tips and Training Videos

Andrew is a performance coach currently working in New Zealand at the U21 Football World Cup. He kindly agreed to an interview with The Flow Centre so we could pick his brains about how he helps top athletes to plug into flow and peak performance.

Andrew starts by quickly reminding us that: “Flow is a skill itself”. It is a state that we can train for and experience in our everyday lives. When we think about flow as a unique mental state that is not combined with notions of luck or some illusive magic space that finds us at random, we can then empower ourselves to find flow frequently in our lives.

“If you want to find flow in your performance, practise it in training…we need to practice under pressure.” His words echo one of The Flow Centre’s core messages – if we want to experience flow, then we need to train for it.

Andrew has formed a company called Brain Builder, which is built around the philosophy: “Living above the line everyday, day in and day out”. He says this phrase means that we need to adopt a ruthless mindset to succeed and leave nothing to the “too hard basket”. It is a phrase that we can use to instantly assess how we are doing in any given situation – are we above the line?

He states we must replicate the performance environment in our training and life as a whole. “Performing at a high level is not a magic switch that we turn on and off…..preparation is key…..you have to guarantee you are doing the best you can in everything you do”. Andrew reminds athletes that we have to be above the line on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday, not just on game day.

One of the primary issues he says athletes face is performing under pressure. Sound familiar? He says: “Pressure is a concept and different for everyone…..when you put your whole self into the performance….and approach pressure with our competitive fire – never give up attitude – the pressure reduces.”

“Its very hard to make it as a professional…so if we are not willing to make our bed in the morning how can we expect to make it in professional sport.”

When asked about the availability of flow for the average Joe, he replied: “If you put yourself above the line you will be amazed how many flow opportunities come available.” He goes on to say: “It is absurd to think flow is reserved for the elite few…..I see students enter flow everyday.” Later in the interview he sums it up concisely: “Flow is not a magic tablet…it takes practice…but we can experience it multiple times a day.”

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Andrew reminds us that play and fun are key to maintaining intrinsic motivation, which is one of Csikszentmihalyi’s key principles of flow: “You can’t find flow in something you don’t enjoy.”

Andrew describes the flow state as a split screen experience of the event. He explains that sometimes we have a ‘helicopter’ view and see things from a distance, as if we are looking down on ourselves. Sometimes we are the ‘ant’, looking at the minute detail that only an ant digging in the dirt can see.

How can we practically experience flow more frequently in our lives?

“Control our breathing. If we can take a moment to invest…ten seconds…to control our breathing and really focus on that…we can control our thoughts a lot better.”

He continued to say the second piece of advice he offers is to detach from the situation. Understand whether the pressure is situational pressure or pressure from within. Once we understand the situation better we can gain clarity and control.

What is the difference between good/best performers and great performers?

“In a one word answer: mindset. For me, this means an unshakeable self-belief…..No matter how the odds are stacked up against us the greats have a never give up attitude…..The greats always find a way…they have an inner core and unshakeable self-belief.”

“Willingness to put yourself out of the comfort zone and not be afraid of failure builds layers of self-belief.”

We would like to thank Andrew for his time and thoughts on flow and peak performance. If you would like to find out more about Andrew, then please get in contact and we will connect the dots, or you can find him on Twitter: @mcbride_andy

 

 

 

 

Aucamthor: Cameron Norsworthy – Performance Director

 

Flow Training – Rich Environment – Awe

Performance Skills Tips and Training Videos

We know that experiencing a rich environment is one of the primary triggers to flow, so for those that are not in the wilderness or experiencing awe form your surroundings, then here is a video to help you get there from your living room. The more we fill our lives and our minds with these almost shocking environments, the more we allow flow to enter our lives, so watch it as often as you can! Make sure your sound is on, and activate full-screen HD for the full experience.

 

This magical short was filmed over the course of seven days at El Teide, Spain’s highest mountain. It is a famous location and renowned as one of the best places in the world to film the stars and see our beautiful skyline. BIG RESPECT and THANKS!

 

Experience Flow Now

Flow Tips and Training Videos

Thanks to FGP and Red Bull Media House, we have a short video designed specifically to help people experience flow. It has been created to help watchers engage in the moment, as it flips form slow mo to fast pace action sports bringing us into the now.

What to do?

Watch the movie, whilst being aware of your senses. Imagine being the athlete, as you seek out every detail, sound, and movement. Allow yourself to become completely immersed in the movie as if you were there, looking through the eyes of the athlete. Engage, observe and experience. Your flow sensation might be small on your’Richter Scale’ but the more familiar we become in experiencing flow on minute levels, the more flow starts to occur in our lives.

Enjoy!

The Art of Flow from Flow Genome Project on Vimeo.

TED video – David Epstein – Technology, Genes, Performance and Improvement

Sports Videos

When you look at sporting achievements over the last decades, it seems like humans have gotten faster, better and stronger in nearly every way. Yet as David Epstein points out in this delightfully counter-intuitive talk, we might want to lay off the self-congratulation. Many factors are at play in shattering athletic records, and the development of our natural talents is just one of them.